Why unemployment doesn’t completely suck

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Currently listening to: The Parrots – Soy Peor

So I started 2019 unemployed. Many people would absolutely baulk at this idea – associating it with a tonne of things: laziness, the problem with Gen Z, etc. Others would use this fact to smirk and prove themselves right when saying that a degree in the humanities doesn’t lead anywhere. In a society where the spirit of late capitalism reigns supreme, and where your salary seems to define what you are and who you are, an unemployed individual is expected to almost play the ‘sick role’ in society.

However, I viewed my unemployment as an opportunity to reflect on what I really want to do in life…an opportunity to spend some time indulging in my passions and actually doing things that have long been delayed, including:

  • Spending more time on my musical projects.
  • Kickstarting a possible path in writing and starting this blog. I’ve been writing in a creative manner all of my life…however after a series of unfortunate rejections, I never found the courage to write publicly until now.
  • Starting a de-cluttering campaign (see my second post).
  • Going through some major life-changing episodes with a clearer head.
  • Discovering and exploring the world of freelancing.
  • Finding the time to catch up with some long-delayed appointments.
  • Nurturing my mental well-being.
  • Spending some well-needed dates with myself.

I guess every cloud has a silver lining…and while unemployment leaves a dent in your pocket, I believe the key is to appreciate it as a window of opportunity for self-development, and not to perceive it as an in-between phase lost in a frenzy of panic, CVs, and interviews. Who knows, maybe unemployment can be the key to finding your next passion in life, leading to something truly worthwhile, after all.

To swipe or not to swipe? That is the question.

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Currently listening to: La Femme – Runway

The modern phenomenon of dating apps has stopped being a phenomenon at this point and is now so ingrained in normality that it’s like expecting that everyone has a social media profile or an email address. Yet, how are dating apps affecting our daily lives and psyche, and is the digital persona more important than your ‘offline’ persona nowadays?

I have always been divided about the concept of these apps. The immediate gratification offered by a simple swipe often leads to a lot of disappointment afterwards. Useless messages and exchanges, the occasional uninvited photos, the meetings that never come to fruition…it’s safe to say that it’s an endless cycle. We can compare it to a ‘window-shopping’ exercise for potential partners… like going on Amazon or eBay to purchase something thanks to a simple ‘Search’ button.

However, are these digital personas turning into a marker of social status? After watching the Black Mirror episode ‘Nosedive’, I couldn’t help but wonder whether dating apps are the new social credit system in the dating world; where people are ‘disposed’ of if they don’t get enough swipes or likes, and where the constant pressure to keep up a trendy digital persona leads to inner conflict. All that seeming plurality creates a tonne of expectations…and a hell lot of dating fatigue.

So what’s the moral of this story? It’s easy to judge and say ‘Delete all apps, and do it the old-fashioned way’, however, I believe that that comment is very misleading since one cannot reverse back to how things were. On the other hand, I would say that at a point, it would be useful to remind ourselves that our own self-worth is not based on any social credit system and to truly invest in our self-worth. A recent post by The Artidote states that ”Inner peace is the new success” and this is totally applicable to the inner turmoil that can be caused if the imposing digital persona and social credit pressures aren’t taken with a pinch of salt. In the end, no one can truly judge you in a few seconds by a few photos and a stupid caption…it takes so much more to discover the inner core of a person than this.